design-is-fine

Imagine a time with no computers but with lots of craftsmanship and creativity. This is my library of art & design history, inspiration from the past.

Norman Ives, typeface as art. More about Yves: printmag

1/ Untitled, 1959. Collage. Synthetic polymer on canvas squares. 2/ Ionic, 1965. Reconstruction: Red and white, canvas on canvas on masonite, polymer and dray pigment. 3/ Number 3-L, 1967. Synthetic polymer on canvas squares 4/ Reconstruction Eclipse. 1967. Bas-relief, black letter fragments. 5/ Centaur, 1973. Screenprint.

Ives’ design and art appeared to be an outlier of the percolating type-as-art movement that may have been popularized by Robert Indiana’s LOVE sculptures, but has since become ubiquitous not just in painting and sculpture but other massive architectural “type works.” Steven Heller.

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Milton Glaser, advertising poster for Albert King for the utopia records, 1976. Source

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Hallmark, 16 month calendar “What Have You Got Toulouse?”, 1970–1971. More wonderful 60s and 70s ephemera: peculiarmanicule.com

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Ceramic tiles, Stoke-on-Trent, 1873. Hard earthenware with transfer pictures. England. Via imm.hu

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Paul Morand, Paris de nuit. . Photography edited by Brassai. Arts et Métiers Graphiques 1933. Font by Cassandre. Via photobibliothek.ch.

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Will H. Bradley, Program, 1931. 50 Books of the Year, Ninth Annual Exhibition, American Institute of Graphic Arts. Via University of Delaware Library

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Backgammon and Chess Board, 1590. Plum wood, invory inlay, painted in indian ink. Southern Germany. Via imm.hu

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Koloman Moser, Textile design, 1901–1918. Vienna. Via kulturpool.at

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Émile Gallé, decorative glass, 1898. Nancy, France. Bronze mount, layered glass. Etched, mould-blown, polychrome enamel painting. Via imm.hu

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Charles Rennie Mackintosh, competition entry “House for an Art Lover), 1901/1902. Mackintosh did win, but the house wasn’t built at that time but decades later from 1989 to 1991 in Bellahouston Park in Glasgow, based on his plans. Via wolfsonian/wiki commons

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Vincent van Gogh, Les bateaux amarrés, 1888. Museum Folkwang. 

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Historic Styles of Ornament, 1898. Published by Batsford, London. With 1500 examples, 100 color plates, 75 chromolithographs. Complete book via archive.org

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Charles Robert Ashbee, Marsh-bird brooch, 1901–1902. Gold, silver, enamel, moonstone, topaz, and freshwater pearl. England.

The brooch was originally a hair ornament that was converted to a brooch. The hair comb was fabricated by A. Gebhardt and enamelist William Mark, both members of the Guild of Handicraft. Via Museum of Fine Arts Boston

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Leopold Bauer, Portfolio / Competition entry “House of an Art Lover”, 1902. Published bei Alex Koch, Darmstadt, Germany. The winner was Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Complete via wolfsonian

Bauer (1872-1938) was a pupil of  Otto Wagner at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. He was both an architect and an arts & crafts designer, as well as a writer on these subjects. He took a mediating position between Historicism and Secession, thereby meeting the taste of most of his contemporaries. Antiquariat Rohlmann

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Georges Seurat, A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte, 1884. wiki. Advertisement for Lands’ End, 1986 by D. Beck.Typical Eighties. Via plumleaves/flickr

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Buick Streamliner, 1948. Designed and manufactured in the 1940s by the mechanical engineer Norman E. Timbs. 
Timbs designed and fabricated much of the project himself, which included a custom aluminum body and steel chassis. It took him over two years to finish. He had worked as an Indy 500 designer, the model was influenced by the Auto Union Stromlinie and Mercedes-Benz Stromlinie which took part in the 1937 Avus GP. These cars ran the fastest GP race of all time nearing speeds of 248.40 mph (400 kph). Source: arch2o.com

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Thomas Theodor Heine, “Siegfried”, 1921.  Heine created the famous red bulldog poster for german satirical magazine “Simplicissimus”, which he also founded in 1896. Obviously a dog lover.

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Edouard Manet, Design for the poster and cover for “The Raven” by Edgar Allan Poe, 1875. Transfer lithograph on simili-parchment. Via metmuseum

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Waka poems (Shikishi), poem cards, pictures of flowers and grasses of the Four Seasons, Tawaraya Sôtatsu, painter, Hon'ami Kôetsu, calligraph. Edo, ca. 1610. Japan. Museum für Asiatische Kunst der Staatlichen Museen zu Berlin, Photo: Jürgen Liepe

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Gerhard Emmoser, Celestial globe with clockwork, 1579. Partially gilded silver, gilded brass (case); brass, steel (movement). Germany.

Exhibition: Making Marvels: Science and Splendor at the Courts of Europe. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, November 25, 2019–March 1, 2020

Between 1550 and 1750, nearly every royal family in Europe assembled vast collections of exquisite and entertaining objects. Public spending and the display of precious metals were expressions of power, and possessing artistic and technological innovations conveyed status. In fact, advancements in art, science, and technology were often prominently showcased in elaborate court entertainments that were characteristic of the period. 

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