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PUNK ROCK TIME CAPSULE FOR A FUTURE GENERATION

Penelope Houston performing with the Avengers in Seattle in 1978, as captured by Bob Kondrak .

(via: http://10thingszine.blogspot.com/2008/04/avengers.html )

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theunderestimator-2:

The Deaf Club in stills from Richard Gaikowskis film DEAF/PUNK (1979) and the amazing story of the San Francisco deaf people’s club that turned into a punk venue during 1978-79 with the deaf staying in as audience!

What would you consider to be the perfect location for a punk venue? An uptown warehouse or a downtown basement or, maybe, some soundproof place where loud music can be played without having to deal with neighbors complaining about the noise?

Well, The Offs’ manager, Robert Hanrahan, had this devilish idea, while walking for a burrito back in 1978, when he spotted the sign “Hall For Rent” concerning the San Francisco deaf people’s club and he envisioned a far-out legendary punk rock club, where mayhem from punk bands such as the Offs, The Zeros, Crime, The Dils, Flipper, The Bags, The Alley Cats, Germs or X was adored by the punk audience, as well as the deaf community, who loved sensing the strong vibrations of the music and the pogoing and were finally able to enjoy loud music the only way they could, while the whole place bounced up and down.

“…By remaining essentially unadvertised (except for posters by Chris Olson & many others), the DEAF CLUB stayed underground through its sporadic existence throughout 1979. The weekend punk-imitators didn’t get the chance to take over…

Robert Hanrahan: I bought a burrito at La Cumbre and noticed a sign on the fire escape across the street. It said “Hall for Rent.” I went up the flights of stairs and saw two guys watching TV with the sound off. After a very short while, I realized we weren’t going to communicate, so I wrote on a piece of paper that I wanted to rent the place. Bill—I never knew his last name-was a mustachioed, lascivious, cigar-chewing character who apparently was in charge. He wrote “OK & $250,” so I wrote “OK.”

I rented a P.A. system from the company I worked for, and booked my favorite bands (…) The social aspect of being able to participate and be accepted was big for the deaf people. They enjoyed being exposed to a different subculture like their own. It was very convivial, no fights or hassles.

In the early days, (…)a patrol officer (…) told me that we had their cooperation, as the “punks were changing the face of the neighborhood and appeared to be bringing the crime rate down.” (…) Sometimes younger cops would drop in to ask about learning to pogo with the real intention of meeting those “loose and wild” punk women.

Penelope Houston: When you went in, you wrote down your drink order and handed it over the bar (…) It was kind of amazing. I think they were dancing to the vibrations. The deaf people were amused that all these punks wanted to come in and rent their room and have these shows…

Winston Smith: They put their hands on the table and they could hear the music. It was music they could appreciate because it was so loud…

Johnnie Walker: …packed full of punks going crazy, bands coming up from Los Angeles, stage diving into the audience, the floor was bouncing up and down. You had mayhem at one end of the club, and all these deaf people at the other drinking beer and signing to each other, grinning all over their faces, because they absolutely adored it. They had all the atmosphere, but they didn’t have to hear the music…

Dennis Kernohan: The deaf people there with balloons, holding them up and feeling the vibrations of the balloons to the Germs, all these fuckin’ great bands, and using these balloons and dancing around.

For a tough old punk, it just made your heart-it gave you that beautiful feeling…

Do yourself a favor and read on for the rest of this one-of-a-kind story through the via link below.

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Two young punk girls on Charing Cross, London, in July 1979, as captured by Lesly Hamilton.

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Jennifer Miro, former prima donna of the early SF punk band The Nuns, as shot by Vincent Anton Stornaiuolo at the Tropicana Hotel in Hollywood in 1981, on the day of her debut with The VIP’s at the Whiskey-A-Go-Go.

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There’s no future ‘n’ England’s dreaming: 

an epic live moment of Jeremy Harrington of Mean Street being showered with beer at the Roxy Club in 1977, as captured by Jeremy Gibbs.

Mean Street was a short lived punk act in the heart of the ‘77 London punk explosion but with no record deal in sight -just their single “Bunch Of Stiffs” included in the “Live At The Vortex ‘77″ comp”- they had already called it a day by mid-’78. The band’s members went on to various more famous acts: Jeremy Harrington joined The Monochrome Set, Gary Webb changed his name to Gary Numan and launched Tubeway Army, while Chris Gorgier and Kenny Bishop formed Action Replay.

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Poison Ivy in her very early days with the Cramps in a see-through top holding a see-through guitar, a Dan Armstrong Plexi that was stolen back then, as seen in the CD booklet for ‘How To Make A Monster’.

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Jerry Nolan and Johnny Thunders with Joe Strummer in the back as captured by Morrissey in Manchester, 1976, during the Anarchy Tour.

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Paul Simonon performing with The Clash at the Mogador Theatre in Paris, Sep. 25, 1981, and looking cool even in a fringe jacket, as documented by Bernard Legon.

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A moment in punk history: 

The Offs (Don Vinil - vocals, Billy Hawk - guitars, Rob Strange - bass, Chris Olson - drums) putting their set list together over a pool table for a ‘79 gig at the Cowell College Dining Hall in Santa Cruz, as captured by Christeen Alcino.

“…The Offs were unique among the first wave of West Coast punk bands in maintaining a home base on both coasts. In San Francisco, their manager discovered the Deaf Club as a live venue, & the Offs released records on the labels CD Presents and 415 Records. In New York City, they hung out with Basquiat (who scrawled their album cover), & released a single on Max’s Kansas City Records. 

The greatest thing was their inability to be pigeon-holed. Were they punk? New wave? Avant-garde? Art rock? No New York noise? A new strain of art jazz? Some odd form of mutant ska gone wrong with bleating sax & screeching vocals? They were sort of all these things, & still others with names that haven’t been invented. 

But what tied them to the punk community was the basic blazing energy to everything they did. These weren’t a bunch of art school posers, they were smash-it-up party skanksters who wanted to do something fresh within an absolutely remarkably creative late-‘70s Bay Area scene – in cahoots with Crime, Nuns, Avengers, Negative Trend, Flipper, Pink Section, Tuxedomoon, Vktms, Mutants, Lewd, Dils, Zeros, & more…”

nathannothinsez.blogspot.com

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Punk at the end of the earth: Zwines, the CBGB’s of the Auckland Punk scene in New Zealand.

Zwines was a building initially used as a 19th century police jail which turned into a nightclub in the ’60s and became the heart of the obscure Auckland punk scene from early 1978 to mid-1979 (when the owners pulled the classic insurance scam and set it on fire), home to some of the finest local acts, a tough punk crowd, underage drinkers and thugs…

“…Few went to Zwines alone (…) Whether it was heaven or hell depended on who you were and how far you were willing to push yourself. But to an ever increasing number of us (…) at some stage during the night you ended up in this seedy, smelly black hole that was, for a brief moment, the epicentre of Auckland’s cutting edge live scene. It was a tough place to play as the audience were an integral part of the act. The band playing to, with, in, and at the crowd.

The Auckland scene developed in isolation from the equivalent scenes in London and NYC, simply because of the way the country remained shut behind a government enforced screen. We heard and read little that was contemporary. We couldn’t buy most of the records until many months after release and nothing of any interest was available via the state owned media (…) But despite that, there was a strength, verve and soul not found in places like the more contrived, and clearly UK-aping scenes in Sydney and Melbourne. Unlike their Australian counterparts nobody, even if they were doing covers, was trying - until much later that is - to be The Sex Pistols, The Stooges or The Clash. It’s hard to successfully mimic someone when all the information you are getting comes via twisted half stories, the odd image and an imported single or two.

New Zealand was very, very, isolated in those days, and our music reflected that. It really was the end of the earth…”

Simon Grigg (early NZ punk scene insider, musician, band/club/record label manager/columnist/writer).

Photos 1,2: Jonathan Jamrag of Rooter & Craig of The Aliens at the dancefloor.

Photo 3: It was part of the ritual at Auckland punk gigs for members of the crowd to sit on the stage looking away from the band.

Photo 4: COPS!!!

Photos 5, 6: Jamie Jetson of The Idle Idols.

Photos 7,8: Ronnie Recent of The Scavengers.

Photo 9: The Terrorways.

Photo 10: Looking down on Zwines, from the fanzine Empty Heads in August 1980.

Photos by Fiona Clark, Gail Young, Jonathan Tidball, Murray Cammick & Paul Luker, found along with info by Simon Crigg on http://simongrigg.info/zwines.htm

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David Bowie writing lyrics for ‘Station to Station’ at Cherokee Studio in LA, as captured in 1975 by Geoff MacCormack.

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February 1978: after the Sex Pistols break-up, Paul Cook & Steve Jones drop by the notorious British criminal Ronnie Biggs’ not-so-hideaway villa in Rio de Janeiro (he had taken part in the Great Train Robbery of 1963 and was living in Brazil at the time, still wanted by the British authorities, but immune from extradition) to record with him for the final chapter of the band’s punk drama, as envisioned by Malcolm McLaren, their manager and evil mastermind who created them, as well as destroyed them.

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Bryan Gregory playing his legendary polka dot Flying V at CBGB’s ca. 1978, as documented by Richard Verdi.

According to Miriam Linna, the Cramps had come to New York in 1975 with a mess of songs and crude home demos and a plan to take over the world, but it was mostly their exotic looks and Flying V guitar that lured Bryan Gregory to join the band. The guitar wasn’t an original Gibson, yet it was his trademark polka dot Flying V:

“…It may have been a knock-off, but it didn’t matter. Bryan was capable of creating the most insane snarls and shrieks out of that crazy deal (…) When we gave the guitar to him, he immediately decorated it with polka-dot price stickers and painted our name in fancy script on the case, and you know what? 

It looked hot!…”

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The Alley Cats, members of the early L.A. punk rock scene, in The Temple Beautiful lobby (an abandoned synagogue that become a punk rock venue in San Francisco) in ‘79, as documented by Bobby Castro.

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Underage Kira Roessler goofing for the camera with friends in 1977

In her pre-Black Flag days she played in various local music groups such as Waxx, The Visitors, The Monsters, Sexsick and Twisted Roots in the Los Angeles area.

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Guy Picciotto’s idea of scoring some points during a gymnasium concert with his band Fugazi in Philadelphia, 1988, as captured by Sean Gustilo.

Falling down the basketball hoop, he crashed straight into the drumset and fucked himself up pretty bad.

***Some footage of this, here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qHsBA_9JWFA***

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Debbie Harry and Clem Burke share a mirror backstage at the Paradise, Boston, where Blondie performed with David Johansen supporting them in 1977, according to Roberta Bayley who shot them.

“Blondie drummer Clem Burke often prepared for CBGB gigs by applying a motley combination of DIY hair products: beer, sugar water, or whatever else was around. He then placed his head inside a preheated oven until his ’do baked to perfection. “You would put the back of your head in the oven,” Burke explained, matter-of-factly, “kind of leaning back in a chair.” Now that’s dedication to style!

“There’s a whole chapter in Rod Stewart’s memoir about hair,” he said, “and then he does the exact same thing, because it’s before people had blow dryers. He would put his hair, his head, in the oven. I was like, ‘Wow. I used to do that.’” Burke added, “So you don’t put your face in it”—otherwise, it would look too much like you’re trying to commit suicide.”

Kembrew McLeod, 333sound.com

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Captain Sensible performing in only his socks with The Damned at the Rainbow Theatre, London, ca. 1978, as captured by Denis O'Regan.

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theunderestimator-2:

The Ramones’ legendary New Year’s Eve gig on this day, 31st December, 1977 at The Rainbow Theatre, London.

This show was recorded and later on released as the band’s first live album, “It’s Alive” (1979).

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It’s Ramones time, so 2020-24-hours-to-go (actually less) and whether you’re getting ready for a wild New Year’s Eve with your mates, an awkward family reunion or a night alone with cheap wine and chips,

Happy New Year, everyone, best wishes and may all the fascists in the world be defeated.

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